Leading and Communicating in Difficult Times by Karen Friedman

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a realistic risk exercise involving scores of local state and federal officials. The purpose of the day- long event was to allow participants to implement emergency response plans, coordinate activities and practice responding to a potential incident that could threaten public safety in order to protect the public should a real life emergency occur. As an observer and evaluator of communication tactics and strategies, what impressed me most was the constant attention of every participant across multiple agencies to protect those who were affected by the threatening situation that was unfolding. To their credit,…

Book Review: Shut Up and Say Something: Business Communication Strategies to Overcome Challenges and Influence Listeners by Karen Friedman

2010, Praeger Hardcover, 249 pages, $44.95 HBA Greater Philadelphia member, 2010 Leadership Conference seminar leader, and HBA Greater Philadelphia chapter speaker Karen Friedman has written a practical, easy to use reference guide for business communications. As her title implies, people often talk a lot and say very little. Karen set out to correct that and empower you to communicate clearly, concisely and passionately in order to impact others with your intended messages. This practical guide is organized from Z to A in order to “remind readers to keep the end goal “Z” in mind when faced with daily communication challenges. Each entry…

Get to the Point: Karen Friedman Practices What She Preaches at HBA Dine Around Event at Davio’s in Philadelphia

by Nancy Powell Connelly “Get to the point,” was the message from Karen Friedman’s dynamic presentation at the HBA Greater Philadelphia Chapter’s Dine Around event at Davio’s restaurant in Philadelphia. Friedman, a leading communication coach, used all the techniques she shared with her rapt audience in making the points in her talk, “Powerful and Persuasive Presentations and Communications.” Make your point early In this age of tweeting important messages in 140 characters, Friedman advises that you get to the point in the beginning of your pitch or presentation. “People remember what they hear first and last,” which she demonstrated very effectively with…